Plants Toxic to Dogs (March 2019)

If you have both a dog and a green thumb, you need to make sure you are educated on plants toxic to dogs.

Having poisonous plants to dogs in your garden, around your yard, in your home, and anywhere your dog has access to, in general, is setting the stage for disaster.

Unfortunately, due to legal reasons and restrictions, I’m not able to provide images of the plants. However, all it takes is a quick search on Google Images to check out the plants I’m about to list.

I am unable to randomly take photos from Google due to copyright laws and, though I tried my best, I could not locate stock photos that were of use for this article.

Autumn Crocus

This plant causes immense burning of the mouth followed by diarrhea, vomiting, liver damage, kidney damage, seizures, and heart arrhythmias.

Cannabis Plant

Before I get into this one, please refrain from commenting about the benefits. I am talking about the cannabis plant not cannabis products – don’t confuse the two.

Delta nine tetrahydrocannabinol causes a wide variety of neurological problems in dogs.

The ingestion of a cannabis plant include poor coordination, drooling, tremors, respiratory problems, coma, and depression.

Sago Palms

Also known as cycads, this plant causes fatality more often than not.

Symptoms of ingestion include diarrhea, vomiting, liver damage and/or failure, and even failure of multiple organs.

Lilies

Tiger, easter, calla, peace, are potentially fatal to dogs.

Symptoms of ingestion include lack of appetite, depression, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach pain, swallowing difficulties, kidney damage and/or failure, and failure of multiple organs.

Dieffenbachia

Also known as dumb cane, dieffenbachia is common in households. Unfortunately, it’s toxic to dogs.

Symptoms of ingestion include swallowing difficulties, oral irritation, vomiting, and burning of the mouth.

Ivy

Nearly all species of the ivy plant are toxic to dogs. As a general rule of thumb, do not keep any ivy species in your home or where your dog has access to.

Symptoms of ingestion include excessive drooling, frothing at the mouth, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach irritation, and noticeable swelling of the lips, tongue, and mouth, overall.

Daffodil

The entire plant is poisonous where dogs are concerned, but the bulb is the most dangerous part. Either way, keep them away from dogs.

Symptoms of ingestion include diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal pain, convulsions, drop in blood pressure, and arrhythmias.

Rubber Tree Plants

Like, ivy, there are a number of rubber tree plants, such as Jade and Indian, that are toxic to dogs. Keep all of these out of reach of your dog, as well.

Symptoms of ingestion include drooling, decreased or lost appetite, skin irritation, diarrhea, and depression.

Chinese Evergreen

Though the toxicity levels depend on how much a dog eats, you should still consider it highly toxic just to be safe.

Symptoms of ingestion include a painful, swollen mouth/oral irritation, swallowing difficulties, excessive drooling, and swelling of the tongue, lips, and mouth, in general.

Philodendrons

The philodendron family plant is mild to moderately toxic to dogs, but should be treated as highly toxic anyway.

Symptoms of ingestion include oral irritation and swelling, swallowing difficulties, excessive drooling, and swelling of the lips, tongue, and mouth, in general.

Latana

This Australian weed is extremely toxic to dogs and should never be kept near them.

Symptoms of ingestion include loss of appetite, weakness, vomiting, diarrhea, depression, abdominal swelling and pain, shock, liver failure, and paralysis.

Azalea

Azaleas may be pretty, but they are extremely toxic to dogs – even a minimal amount of leaves is enough to kill a dog.

Symptoms of ingestion include vomiting, oral irritation, diarrhea, coma, drop in blood pressure, and, if left untreated, death.

Aloe Vera

The direct ingestion of an aloe vera plant, not to be mistaken with appropriate aloe vera products for dogs, can be deadly.

Symptoms of ingestion include lethargy, anorexia, diarrhea, vomiting, depression, changes in the color of urine, and tremors.

Asparagus Fern

Also known as lace fern or emerald feather, can be mild to moderately toxic to dogs.

Symptoms of ingestion include drooling, diarrhea, vomiting, allergic dermatitis, and abdominal pain.

Cyclamen

Also called sowbread, this plant is common in households. The poisonous properties in them, however, make them dangerous to dogs.

Symptoms of ingestion include diarrhea, vomiting, oral irritation, seizures, heart abnormalities, and, if left untreated, death.

Oleander

This plant is popular in the south of North America, but it’s very toxic to dogs. It has the potential to cause fatal heart abnormalities.

Symptoms of ingestion include poor coordination, bloody diarrhea, vomiting, and muscle tremors.

Kalanchoe

Known as the mother-in-law plant, this common house plant is toxic to dogs.

Symptoms of ingestion include diarrhea, vomiting, and, in some cases, heart arrhythmias.

Tulip

The bulb is the most toxic part of the plant where dogs are concerned, but the entire thing is poisonous and should be kept far away from your dog.

Symptoms of ingestion include nausea, excessive drooling, and oral irritation.

Poisonous Plants to Dogs

Unfortunately, there are hundreds, maybe thousands, of plants that are toxic to dogs. It would take me days to list them all.

Instead, I looked into some of the most common ones to ensure you can gain knowledge on which plants are toxic to dogs, what the symptoms of ingestion are, etc.

If you’re concerned about whether you have a plant in your home that is toxic to dogs, ask me in the comments and I’ll let you know.

If you’re concerned your dog has eaten a poisonous plant, take him to the vet immediately.

 

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